Tag Archives: supercar

Koenigsegg Regera

Autoart creates a stellar 1:18 scale “practical” supercar …

Hard as it is to imagine, the 1500-horsepower Koenigsegg Regera is not meant for the racetrack.

No, Swedish supercar maker Koenigsegg (bless you!) intends the Regera as a grand touring luxury sports car. PR from Christian von Koenigsegg, the car maker’s founder, says Regera is a more practical luxury car than its predecessor the Agera, or the new Jesko.

Somehow its looks and $1.89 milllion price tag do not send a practical message.

Autoart, who created four stellar Agera models, now turns its attention to the Targa-topped Regera, which it offers in three colors, White, Candy Red and Horizon Blue. While not cheap, the $300 price tag seems paltry compared with the nearly $2 mil original.

The History

Regera was introduced in 2016 and is still in production, but only 80 will ever be made, and all were pre-sold, so the Autoart versions are the most easily acquired.

Its name means to reign or rule and surely if you had the real thing it would rule any road it deigned to grace, and not just because of the price of entry, although that is sheik-worthy.

Regera touts a unique direct drive system in place of a tranny and links that with a plug-in hybrid system that combines a twin-turbo 5.0-liter V8 with three electric motors. Total output is 1,500 horsepower and 1,475 pound-feet of torque. The electric motors alone create 697 hp. Koenigsegg claims to have the most power-dense battery pack on the planet with an 800-volt liquid-cooled unit.

Naturally the Regera doesn’t weigh a lot, tipping the scales at just 3,500 lbs. and using 3D printed parts, carbon fiber, and Kevlar to ensure a feathery, but strong structure. Other goodies include active engine mounts, active rear and front wings, running lights known as constellation lights that resemble the night sky, and Regera rides on sticky Michelin Pilot Sport tires, 19-inch up front and 20-inch in back.

How fast is this practical luxury sports car?

Regera is the fastest car in the world from 0 to 249 mph, clipping it off in 31.49 seconds, which takes 1.8 seconds off its sister car, the Agera’s, previous record. Top speed is said to be limited to 251 mph.  Right, any faster would be silly, right?

The Model

               There is nothing silly about Autoart’s model , a gem from stem to stern with opening doors, hood and rear hatch, plus steerable wheels and a rear spoiler that can be deployed.

               The white model features a black center stripe of imitation carbon fiber that is trimmed in red. Its nose features a carbon fiber-look chin spoiler and the targa top is easily removed to expose the cockpit. That top has a clear panel inset to the black carbon fiber area too.

               Regera’s doors are fascinating, sliding outward first, then flipping up like scissor doors. Very clever and bravo to Autoart for mastering the mechanics. Side windows are fixed in the doors.

               The Regera’s black interior features black bucket seats with cloth shoulder harnesses that stay behind the seats, but you can see a photo-etched clasp near the seat’s base. The center console is nicely detailed as is the center stack with buttons clearly visible and the silver oval air ducts atop the stack and off to the sides of the dash. All are hooded as is the main instrument panel in front of the driver’s racy flat-bottom steering wheel.

               A giant single-armed wiper extends to cover the widespread wraparound windshield.

               Under the rear hatch is that big twin-turbo V8 with carbon fiber cover and battery packs and motors at the tail. With the hatch up you see sharp detailing of the rear suspension system too, with spring-over coils with copper canisters.

               Impressive too is the subtle Koenigsegg nameplate on the hatch’s rear lip.

               The thick treaded tires include the proper Michelin branding and sizing info (matte black on black) and there are huge drilled disc brakes behind the sporty black wheels. Red Koenigsegg-branded calipers complete the racy look, or should I say Practical?

Nice wheel, tire, and brake detail.

               What is practical are the two big black mirrors that are packed separately for the buyer to slip into holes drilled atop the doors. That was easy, and you’re given two extra in case you break or lose one.

               One other note, in case you think that front trunk (frunk) is useless, well the targa top will slide in there upside down for later use. Clever, both in real life and in this hyper-realistic model.

               Practical or racy Regera is one gorgeous car and Autoart creates one gorgeous model.

Vital Stats: Koenigsegg Regera

Maker: Autoart
Scale: 1/18
Stock No.: 79027
MSRP: $300

Link: Autoartmodels.com

Diecast: Autoart’s McLaren Senna

Beautiful Senna model designed for speed, car lust …

If beauty be only skin deep, so be it, especially if that object of visual lust is a mid-engine McLaren Senna, be it a throbbing full-size version or a silent 1:18 diecast scale model snug in a showcase.

Autoart has an encyclopedic knowledge of beauty and sensuous supercar lines and it’s not afraid to use it to create products of automotive amore. Its current 11 on a scale of 10 is the Trophy Mira (orange for us neophytes) McLaren Senna, which is based on the studly McLaren 720S, not a bad place to start.

The History

Formula 1 fanatics are fully aware of both McLaren and Senna, as in Ayrton Senna, the three-time F1 World Driving Champion, who as luck would have it, won all his titles driving for the McLaren F1 team. The Brazilian was often touted as the best F1 driver ever, but certainly of the late 1980s to 1994 when he was killed in the San Marino Grand Prix, driving not a McLaren, but a Williams F1 car.

McLaren holds exclusive rights to the Senna name for automobiles and that moniker is money in the bank for prestige, even 25+ years after Senna’s death.

Of course any McLaren supercar would live up to the Senna reputation for speed, but this model was designed to be extremely light to set faster times than previous models, so racy on its face. It touts a 4.0-liter twin-turbo V8 that makes 789 horsepower while using a 7-speed dual-clutch transmission. Weight is a miniscule 3,029 pounds. Thrust? McLaren claims 0-60 mph in 2.8 seconds, a 9.9 second quarter mile. You get the picture.

To keep it light there’s a carbon fiber monocoque chassis and to insure it’s stuck to the ground at 211 mph, its top speed, McLaren melds a double-element rear wing to its tail. In addition to downforce it also acts as an air brake (remember that on the 1967 Indy STP Turbine?) The wing is slightly adjustable even on Autoart’s model.

Up on the roof is a prominent air scoop, plus giant side air intakes to keep the engine and brakes cool at race speeds. Then there are the dihedral doors that fold up to allow the driver and a daring passenger to slip inside, and then windows set within the side windows, again for aero purposes. Folks of a certain age will remember similar windows on the racy 1990s Subaru SVX.

And if you have to ask, yes there are Brembo carbon ceramic brakes, and all for just a smidge over $1 million, asking price. Just 500 Sennas were to be made, the first delivered in 2018 and they don’t make them quickly at McLaren’s plant in Woking, Surrey, England.

The Model

               Autoart on the other hand has created five color variations of the Senna — blue, gray, black, white, and this glorious nearly glow-in-the-dark metallic orange. Seeing as how McLaren’s early racers were all a bright papaya orange, this seems the most appropriate color and with its black cockpit area, rear wing, chin spoiler, ground effects trim and rear diffuser, plus gloss black wheels the overall visual can leave one gobsmacked.

               All that black trim, nose to tail, around the inset thin lights, the nose before the cockpit and panels beneath the wing’s struts are mock carbon fiber patterned to resemble the real deal. A small rectangular McLaren nameplate graces the sleek nose and even the side mirror housings resemble carbon fiber.

               Roof and window trim are all gloss piano black with all the proper seams and outlines of the door hinges, those inserted side windows within windows, and the clear panels above each seat. There also are clear inserts in the doors, again trimmed in black gloss. In theory, one could see the driver and passenger’s legs through those panels.

               Inside the massive side air scoops are black mesh screens and then tiny carbon fiber aero devices like Gurney flaps on the inner edges of the rear fenders to direct air up to that monster two-tier rear wing.

               Through the octagonal rear hatch window one can see the top of the twin-turbo V8, just enough to not feel cheated that the rear bonnet doesn’t open. Go all the way to the tail and there’s a six-sided black opening under the wing with what would be a trio of black titanium exhaust pipes. Imagine their rich exhaust tone on that million dollar baby.

               Below that is more black mesh grillework on the tail, a McLaren nameplate and the black multi-finned diffuser. A joint McLaren/Senna plate also labels the rear, where a license might go if you were using your Senna on the street, not just the track.

               Wheels are gloss black with a McLaren swish logo on the hub and enormous drilled disc brakes behind with blue calipers. Tires are thick treaded rubber properly labeled Pirelli P-Zeros, so you know they were designed for maximum adhesion.

               Senna’s interior is easy to view and easy on the eyes as you flip up the dihedral doors. The door frame reinforces the fact the McLaren has a carbon fiber cockpit with another McLaren nameplate and logo on the bottom of the frame. Seats are a soft black plastic to somewhat mimic the Alcantara leather seats of the street machine.

               Autoart nails the dash detail too with carbon fiber touches, chrome air vents, a flat-bottom three-spoke race steering wheel and a big vertical screen aimed at the driver for ease of use. The model features black cloth seatbelts with metal clasps to further aid realism and yes, there’s a Senna logo on the passenger-side dash.

               Short of working lights and engine this is as close to a perfect recreation of one of the most beautiful cars in the world. Yet even at $260 it’s much more affordable for your collection than plunking down for a 1:1 scale, even if it were slightly used and needed new tires. You know it would.  

Vital Stats: McLaren Senna (Trophy Mira/Orange)

The wing flattened out.

Maker: Autoart
Scale: 1/18
Stock No.: 76078
MSRP: $260

The wing slightly angled.

Link: Autoartmodels.com

2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Coupe

Chevy’s mid-engine Vette thumbs its nose at the Supercars

The nose still screams Corvette!
The old and new, a Piper Cub rests behind the 2020 mid-engine Vette at Hartford’s municipal airport.

Chevy’s new Corvette is kryptonite to the ever-growing bevy of Supercars.

For more than 65 years Chevrolet’s everyman’s dream car has put its throbbing V8 power in front of the driver, but with the eighth generation that all changes. Supercars beware!

Now the Vette’s 6.2-liter V8 moves behind the driver in a mid-engine arrangement that seems new and exciting even though supercar makers, plus Ford with its GT, have been milking this layout for years.

While new and exciting looking there’s a familiarity too with the new Corvette. Stand in front and you’ll see the family resemblance, the pointed nose, the long headlights, the rounded front wheel wells. There’s even a tall flat rear shoulder that exudes Corvette styling. Continue reading 2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Coupe

2020 BMW M8 Competition Convertible

M8 drop-top an elegant refined rocket, near supercar … 

Two questions: How much did you pay for your house? How much would you pay for a supercar, or near supercar?

The first may vary wildly depending on how long ago you bought your home, but if you’re thinking Ferrari, Lamborghini, Bugatti, or McLaren for the supercar, you’re likely imagining a price tag north of $1 million.

Relax, this new 2020 BMW M8 Competition Convertible is much cheaper. But at $180,245 it’s nearly double what we paid for the 1950s Savage ranch (home) about 30 years ago, and the darned M8 doesn’t even have a bathroom. Continue reading 2020 BMW M8 Competition Convertible

Die-cast: Autoart’s 2017 Dodge Viper GTS-R ACR

Striking Viper GTS-R ACR is a ‘super’ car, in scale …

I consider myself lucky that as part of my gig of driving and reviewing new cars for newspapers and websites I’ve crushed the gas pedal on several Dodge Vipers, but not the Viper GTS-R ACR. That’s the racy version that put the cap on the Viper run from 1991 to 2017, not all inclusive.

That’s right, whether you remember or not, Viper took a few years off as sales lagged and insurance companies questioned their wisdom of covering these rocket sleds being driven on public roads.

I can tell you the various V10 engines that Dodge packed under Viper’s long muscular hood were all among the most powerful cars I’ve ever driven, some new Hellcats being the most recent exceptions. The Viper was a beast! Continue reading Die-cast: Autoart’s 2017 Dodge Viper GTS-R ACR

Die-cast: Autoart’s Bugatti Chiron

Wow, even in 1/18 scale this Bugatti rocks …

The Bugatti Chiron, where to begin?

Starting price is $2.6 million in round numbers, and the first 200 made sold out immediately, even before the first car was delivered. It’s possible we need a new term that’s greater than Supercar. Continue reading Die-cast: Autoart’s Bugatti Chiron

Die-cast: Autoart McLaren P1 GTR

McLaren’s P1 GTR a sexy beast …

Supercars are like cell phones, always one-upping each other to the point that they blend together. Which one is fastest today?

They also all seem cut from the same well chiseled mold with swoopy looks and rounded edges that reflect the stylings of Le Mans-style racers, and at nearly the same cost. Continue reading Die-cast: Autoart McLaren P1 GTR

Die-cast: Autoart’s Lamborghini Huracan LP 610-4

Lamborghini Huracan a 1/18-scale hottielambo3

Ferraris are fine, but Lamborghinis have been pressing the styling envelope more during the past 20 years or so. The new Huracan, Spanish for hurricane, continues the Italian car maker’s design dominance.

Long, low and sleek with little slits of headlights and taillights and an engine just behind the supercar’s two bucket seats give the Huracan both an elegant and bullet-like appearance.

Autoart nails it again with this, a composite-bodied model of the Lamborghini Huracan LP 610-4 in a stunning orange pearl paint scheme. This thing will nearly glow on your display shelf.Lamborghini Huracan

The History

The Huracan replaces Lamborghini’s popular and swoopy Gallardo model, the Huracan hitting the streets in late 2014. Continue reading Die-cast: Autoart’s Lamborghini Huracan LP 610-4

Die-cast: Autoart Lamborghini Countach 25th Anniversary

Special Lamborghini Countach beautifully recreatedlambo1

Some consider Lamborghini’s Countach the first modern supercar, or at least the first via design to slap the auto world awake to say that styling AND performance dictate what’s a supercar and what’s not.

Countach launched us into the wedge-shaped era for supercars with its trapezoidal panels and slick scissor doors.

Autoart is no stranger to this market either, having launched quite a few Lamborghini models through the years, including some stellar Countachs. Now it recreates the silver 25th Anniversary Countach, marking Lambo’s 25th year in 1988, with a Signature Series 1:18 model.

The History

Only 658 of the anniversary edition cars were made between 1988 to 1990, all featuring Lambo’s massive 5167 cc mid-engine V-12 and representing Countach styling at its zenith. The car went out of production in 1990 as Diablo was launched. Continue reading Die-cast: Autoart Lamborghini Countach 25th Anniversary

Die-cast: Autoart Gumpert Apollo

Gumpert Apollo: Only the name is funny for this super cargumpert

Let’s face it, with a name like Gumpert it’s hard to take a car too seriously. You sort of suspect it will come with a box of chocolates.

But the Gumpert Apollo S deserves respect, it’s a rocket of a supercar and developed by the likes of an ex-Audi engineer who knows a thing or three about high-speed, low-drag sports cars.

Autoart deserves some credit too for creating a 1:18 version of a car with about as much name recognition as you or I would have if running for political office. Credit them too for painting the review car a brilliant metallic orange that will add a bit of fireworks to any collection. This Gumpert Apollo is a supersonic pumpkin on wheels.gumpert5

The History

Roland Gumpert had worked for Audi-VW before he and Roland Mayer started Gumpert Sportwagenmanufaktur in Altenburg, Germany. Along with Marco Vanetta they designed two scissor-doored prototypes that were introduced in 2005.

That same year the Apollo hit the racing circuits in Europe and scored a third at Hockenheim and by 2008 a hybrid version was racing at the 24 Hours of Nurburgring in Germany.

The Apollo, the makers say, is a street-legal mid-engined race car, a two-seater that tips the scales at just 2,400 lbs. It boasts three engine choices, all based off an Audi V8. These are bi-turbos that crank between 650 and 790 horsepower and deliver a top speed of nearly 225 mph. Those turbos give it great torque and acceleration times, doing 0-100 km/h (62 mph) in 3.1 seconds.

gumpert1That’s quick! In fact, the BBC’s popular Top Gear TV show set their own track record with a Gumpert Apollo, beating the likes of Bugatti’s Veyron and Pagani’s Zonda.

The rear-drive supercar rides on a tubular chromoly frame with fiberglass or carbon fiber body, depending on what’s ordered. Naturally these are all hand built. The Apollo rides on a 110-inch wheelbase and is just 43.9 inches tall.

The Model:

Yes, the Autoart model is beautiful because of its paint job alone, but there is considerable detail too.

Start with the parts count; that always gives you some indication of the quality. This one has 479 parts of which 211 are metal and 38 are photo-etched. Each model gets 131 free-hand sprays to give it a thick glossy coat too. This is well beyond toy quality finishes.gumpert4

Autoart is generous with its black mesh grillwork and carbon fiber-look underpinnings below the easily removed nose section. Taking that portion off allows the collector to see three jewel-like headlights and orange hoses that collect air for the massive disc brakes, which are easily visible behind the racy black-spoked wheels with anodized blue center mounting nuts.

Raising the rear bonnet to see the engine requires loosening a couple screws and then propping up the body work with a special strut. Makes for a dramatic pose, plus you can see the plumbing and wiring. I like the carbon fiber look giant rear wing here too and the diffuser on the car’s rear lower lip.

gumpert2There’s more of the black carbon fiber on the giant air scoop mounted on the roof and more black mesh grille work around the quad exhaust pipes and in air vents fore and aft of the scalloped area that cuts into the Apollo’s sides.

The Gumpert’s interior looks fine with the gullwing doors open, but close inspection shows a gray hard plastic dash and seats that look very much like plastic due to their smooth texture. But there’s a shifter and black racing seatbelts to give it a more finished appearance.

Hard not to like a beautiful low-slung supercar in metallic orange and with all the detailing this Gumpert Apollo offers. If you’re a supercar collector, this is an unusual model of a rare racer.     gumpert3

FAST Stats: Gumpert Apollo S (orange)

Maker: Autoart

Scale: 1/18

Stock No.: 71302

MSRP: $232.90gumpert6