Tag Archives: 1:43 die-cast

Die-cast: NEO 1970 Pontiac GTO, The Judge

The Judge was Pontiac’s ultimate torque master …

By 1970 the muscle car craze had reached its peak and the Big 3 were mining niches in the muscle car vain with special models to maximize revenue These niche muscle machines were aimed directly at the most extreme torque-loving buyers.

Into this world came Pontiac’s 1970 GTO Judge for the 1970 model year offering a choice of two 400-cid V8s ready to grind the tires off this performance-based Pontiac. Continue reading Die-cast: NEO 1970 Pontiac GTO, The Judge

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NEO’s 1959 Oldsmobile Ninety-Eight Hardtop

Oldsmobile 98 was a land yacht, but in 1:43 scale it’s just right …NEO's 1959 Oldsmobile Ninety-Eight Hardtop, Cadillac, 1:43 scale

Cars used to be boats, as in they were so long that some folks called them land yachts.

Case in point, the 1959 Oldsmobile Ninety-Eight Hardtop … size, etc. and riding on a monster 126.3-inch wheelbase. That’s just a bit shy of today’s Chevrolet Suburban. No wonder the 5 kids fit so well in the back seat and the trunk carried luggage for a family of seven or eight.

NEO recreates the lengthy Ninety-Eight in all its chrome-trimmed glory in 1/43 scale and for a modest price, considering the inflation in small collector car prices the last couple years.

The History1959 Olds, Oldsmobile, 98, Ninety Eight, Buick, Cadillac

The Ninety-Eight was Oldsmobile’s largest, and finest car, sharing its looks with the next model down, the Eighty Eight. Olds had four models in its Ninety Eight line-up, but the hardtop (meaning no B-pillar) was the looker of the bunch. All were related to other top GM models, the Cadillac Eldorado, Sixty Special, Deville and Series 62, plus Buick’s big boy, the Electra.

The Olds models featured power air scoop brakes, Jetaway Hydramatic transmission, power steering, a Safety spectrum speedometer, rocker panel moldings, and clock. Power came from a 394 cu.in. 6.5-liter, Rocket V8. You gotta love any engine called a Rocket V8! Continue reading NEO’s 1959 Oldsmobile Ninety-Eight Hardtop

Die-cast: BoS-Models’ Chevrolet Corvette Corvair Concept

Corvette Corvair Concept sharp car at low costDSCF0143

Early Corvettes were stylish sports cars, not the big fire-breathing muscle rods they became by the 1970s and that they continue as today.

So a fastback model in 1954 would have been cooler than even Ford’s Thunderbird and shows General Motors had the right idea, if only in concept form. Funny too, they named it the Corvette Corvair, joining two names that Chevrolet would ultimately use.

Now BoS-Models has created a high-value 1:43 of this unusual concept as it first appeared in a bright Ruby Red paint scheme. And while I don’t usually dwell on price here, I’ve got to mention it’s just $38.95 and looks fabulous in its acrylic case.

The History

First, an explanation of the concept car that made its debut at the 1954 GM Motorama, a show in New York City. Chevrolet used the front-end of its new Corvette, but made it into a fastback coupe by grafting a sloping roof onto the sporty Vette. The tail here reflects the popular aircraft styling of the mid- to late-1950s. Continue reading Die-cast: BoS-Models’ Chevrolet Corvette Corvair Concept

Die-cast: 1959 Dodge Custom Royal Lancer Convertible

NEO’s ‘Forward Look’ Dodge Lancer is Fin-tasticDSCF0133

I admit to having a soft spot in my car styling heart for the “Forward Look” Chrysler and Dodge models created by Virgil Exner in the late 1950s and early ‘60s.

These big-finned beauties featured dramatic taillights and oodles of chrome trim on their fronts, sides and backs. My Uncle Paul had a white 1959 Chrysler 300 that barely fit in his garage with fins taller than me.

So I’m a big fan of NEO’s 1:43 scale Dodge Custom Royal Lancer Convertible and its beautiful red and white paint scheme.

The History

Dodge offered the Royal and Custom Royal from 1955-59 and the NEO model depicts the top-level Custom Royal in its heyday and final year, featuring dual jet exhaust taillights under each chrome-laden fin. The convertible featured a “Wedge” big-block V8 that used a wedge-shaped combustion chamber along with 383 cubic inches of displacement. The serious performance buyers snagged Dodge’s Super D-500 V8 overhead valve engine, a $415 option, with a massive 345 horsepower.DSCF0135

Royals and Custom Royals were available in hardtop, sedan, convertible and station wagon body styles and a base four-door listed at $2,934 in 1959. The premium Custom Royal convertible sold for $3,422 and 984 were sold that model year. Chrysler touted the use of front torsion bars and its mighty engines, plus push-button automatic transmissions. For 1959 there was an elliptical steering wheel and swivel front bucket seats too. Continue reading Die-cast: 1959 Dodge Custom Royal Lancer Convertible

Die-cast: Autoart Lamborghini Aventador J

Small roofless Aventador looks greatlambo1

Proving that good things come in small packages I present the Lamborghini Aventador J in 1/43 scale by Autoart. This is one beautiful model, and comes at well less than you might expect to pay for a fine diecast car in this scale.

The History

The edgy Aventador coupe was unveiled at the 2011 Geneva Motor Show and just a year later Lamborghini revealed the J, a roofless model with no windshield, just tiny windscreens as you’d expect on a racer.lambo3

Reportedly Lambo’s CEO Stephan Winkelmann asked his design crew to create “something special” for the Geneva show, but just 6 weeks before the prestigious car show. Talk about deadlines!

The racer wanna-be uses Aventador’s 6.5-liter V12 engine that creates 700 horsepower and links that to a 7-speed tranny. The car, which rides on a carbon fiber monocoque, shuns goodies like a radio and air conditioning to save weight and is said to tip the scales at just 3,472 lbs.

Its only carryovers from the Aventador are the hood, front and rear fenders and headlights. Reportedly this one-off concept car was sold for $2.8 million before it even hit the Geneva show floor. For reference, the standard (as if) goes for roughly $400 grand. Continue reading Die-cast: Autoart Lamborghini Aventador J

Die-cast: Automodello 1930 Duesenberg J Murphy Torpedo

Duesenberg J Murphy Torpedo was fast, beautifulduesy4

Growing up in Indiana I learned that Duesenbergs were fast and beautiful, and there wasn’t much more to learn.

That was, until I found out there were many varieties due to various coachbuilders creating the bodywork on the 1920s and 30s models. Now Automodello goes and creates one of the all-time most beautiful Duesys ever, the J with Murphy-bodied Torpedo styling. This one is in 1:43 scale, which makes it all that more remarkable for its exterior detail.

The History

The first Model J was unveiled at the 1928 New York Auto Show, just a year before the Great Depression. That alone tells you what the likelihood of success was for the model. Duesenberg, run by two brothers in Indianapolis, had gained worldwide acclaim for mechanical excellence by winning the Indianapolis 500 several times and the 1921 French Grand Prix. Duesenberg was the first American car to win a GP, the second being Dan Gurney’s Eagle in 1967. They are still the only two.

Looks even better with the roof off!
Looks even better with the roof off!

But E.L. Cord bought Duesenberg in 1926 and demanded large luxury cars that he could sell to the nation’s elite, folks like Clark Gable, Greta Garbo and James Cagney. Fred Duesenberg responded with exquisite cars with ladder frames and six cross members to restrict vibration, plus an automatically lubricating chassis. Its heart was a 32-valve, double overhead cam, 6.9-liter straight-eight engine creating 265 horsepower and a world-beating 120 mph top speed. Continue reading Die-cast: Automodello 1930 Duesenberg J Murphy Torpedo

Die-cast: Automodello 1934 Packard Twelve Convertible Victoria

This gorgeous dark blue model is the rarer Tribute Edition.
This gorgeous dark blue model is the rarer Tribute Edition from Automodello.

Automodello creates stunning 1934 Packard Twelve Convertible

Packard was a big deal prior to World War II, a player, one of the top makes in this country and recognized overseas for its quality and luxury.

Even in 1934 when the Depression was at full song, Packard was turning out fancy machines for the upper crust and its Twelve, named after its impressive 12-cylinder engines, was top-shelf.

Automodello likes Packards, this being its second Twelve release in the last two years. The former 1:43 model was the 1938 Twelve Victoria convertible, while this is the stately ’34 Twelve Victoria, with body designed by Raymond Dietrich. As with many Automodello models, there are three versions.

The History

Dietrich worked for many car companies over his career, including Lincoln, Studebaker, Franklin and Erskine. He co-founded LeBaron and was Chrysler’s first design director. Side note, he also designed the famous Gibson Firebird guitar in the 1960s. Continue reading Die-cast: Automodello 1934 Packard Twelve Convertible Victoria