All posts by Paul Daniel

Family, Faith, and Speed....... My wife works for a major healthcare provider. She's the brains of the operation since she has a Masters in Nursing. Our daughter takes after one of her grandmothers with her passion for music. Really great kid! Even loves aviation, one of my passions, and is looking at a possible career in it. I'm heavily involved in a variety of volunteer rolls at the Catholic Church we attend. I love speed!!! I'm a pilot, car guy, and ride a Suzuki Hayabusa. 0-60 in 3.2 seconds, 0-100 in 5 although I'll have to take Suzuki's word on that. I love going for rides with friends and enjoy the twisties where my bike really shines. I've been in the cockpits of a DC-8, DC-9, 767, 747, MD-80, and Embraer 190. I spend a week each year volunteering at the EAA flyin in Oshkosh. Love the Thunderbirds (autographed one of my F-16's) and the Blue Angels. Love the roar as they make passes.

Promo model: 1960 Ford Thunderbird

1960 Ford Thunderbird, 1960 ford thunderbird promotional model, promotional model review.Here’s a quick question and I bet only the T’bird geeks will get it. Geeks in a good way. The T’bird might not have happened at all. Henry Ford II came up with a 2-seat concept and it was called the Vega! Wonder what Chevy would have had to come up with a name for their Vega? Henry’s had meager power, European looks, and cost, so it never proceeded to production. The Thunderbird was similar in concept, but would be more American in style, more luxurious, and less sport-oriented and it became an instant hit. Although the Thunderbird had been considered a rousing success, Ford executives felt that the car’s position as a two-seater restricted its sales potential. The car was redesigned as a four-seater for 1958. Though retaining a design as a two-door hardtop coupe/convertible, the new Thunderbird was considerably larger than the previous generation, with a longer 113.0 inches (2,870 mm) wheelbase to accommodate the new back seat. Continue reading Promo model: 1960 Ford Thunderbird

Diecast cars: Autoart’s Stealth LeMans winning Mazda

Diecast Car: Autoart’s Stealth LeMans winning Mazda a stunner

Reviewed by Mark Savage

Autoart’s Stealth LeMans winning Mazda, diecast car reviews
Photo’s Courtesy Autoart

The 24 Hours of LeMans is just behind the Indianapolis 500 in longevity, notoriety and importance in the racing world. Long a bastion of success for European sports car makers, the likes of Porsche, Audi, Jaguar, Peugeot and Ferrari, the 1991 race will always be remembered as the year a Japanese make, Mazda, finally won the title. After 13 years of trying, Mazda won with its beautiful rotary-engine powered 787B. The winning drivers were Johnny Herbert, Bertrand Gachot and Volker Weidler, all former Formula 1 drivers. Continue reading Diecast cars: Autoart’s Stealth LeMans winning Mazda

Promo models: 1970 AMC Javelin

1970 Javelin, Mark Donahue
Special script and spoiler on 1970 Javelin

American Motors had a hit on its hands with their Javelin. Introduced in 1968 as AMC’s answer to the Mustang and Camer0. In 1970 they made some design changes to take advantage of the 390 V8 they offered as an option. This was at the height of the pony car wars and performance was king. They even signed up Roger Penske and Mark Donahue to campaign one in the Trams-Am racing series.

To capitalize on the car’s success on the race track, AMC offered a Mark Donahue package which included a spoiler with Donahue’s signature on it, the 390 engine and, the air intake on the hood. Javelins with this option in good shape command around $20-25,000 mostly because there were only about 2,500 of them manufactured.

1970 AMC Javelin Promo Model, promotional model carsThe promo models are also well sought after. Continue reading Promo models: 1970 AMC Javelin

Promo models: Chrysler Turbine

The Chrysler Turbine Car was the first and only consumer test ever conducted of gas turbine-powered cars. Of the total 55 units built consisting of 5 prototypes and 50 production cars given to one person in every state to use for three months. Produced from 1962-1964, the bodies were made by Ghia in Turin, Italy, with final assembly taking place in a small plant in Detroit, MI.

Growing up in Milwaukee, WI. I saw one of these out and must have followed it for miles. Not only a very cool looking car but that sound. Most were scrapped at the end of a trial period, with only nine remaining in museums and private collections like this one owned by Jay Leno. Though Chrysler’s turbine engine project was terminated in 1977, the Turbine Car was the high point of a three decade project to perfect the engine for practical use. Continue reading Promo models: Chrysler Turbine