Tag Archives: thunderbird

Die-cast: Automodello 1971 Lincoln Continental Mark III

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What says Continental more than the fake tire sculpted into the trunk lid?

Resin Continental Mark III a rare offering

Rarity plays a big role in full-size vintage auto prices.

This is true too for diecast models, which is what makes Automodello’s new 1:24 Lincoln Continental Mark III a hit, even at its strong $299 asking price. This is a car for baby boomers who favor the classics over muscle cars. (I know that’s heresy.)

This is rare in that I’ve never seen a 1971 Lincoln Continental Mark III in cast resin and in 1:24 scale. On that front Automodello has created a stunningly accurate and beautiful body with crisp accent and trim lines that reflect the Continental’s long, lean elegance.

The History:

The Mark III was a Lee Iacocca idea that legend has it came from his desire to see a Thunderbird of the day equipped with a big Rolls Royce grille. That pretty well sums up the Mark III’s appearance.

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The giant grille is reminiscent of that used by Rolls Royce.

But it was 300 lbs. heavier than the T-bird, yet packed 365 horsepower coming from a new 460 cu.in. V8. That engine was created to help Lincoln challenge Cadillac’s Eldorado, along with the likes of Oldsmobile’s Toronado and Buick’s Riviera. Continue reading Die-cast: Automodello 1971 Lincoln Continental Mark III

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Die-cast: Automodello Mustang I

Automodello cranks out a rare Mustang I in 1:24th

OK, I get it, not all you plastic modelers are diecast nuts like me. But how about a resin Mustang I Concept car, and in 1:24 scale no less.Mustang1

That’s what the folks over at Automodello have cranked out for you, and only a limited number will be made – 499 to be exact. There’s also a limited run 1:43 model too. But let’s get to the history and the model here.

The History:

Sports and sporty cars had been the rage throughout the 1950s among the racing set. Chevrolet had responded with its Corvette and Ford went a bit more luxury touring oriented with its Thunderbird.

Next up was Chevrolet’s lower cost sports coupe, the Corvair, with its rear-mounted engine. Ford needed an answer.

So in 1962 Ford tried something different, an open 2-seater that was quick and light and independently sprung at all four wheels. Ford’s new baby was the Mustang I, a concept that noted Formula 1 racer Dan Gurney showed off during an F1 race weekend at Watkins Glen (N.Y.) in October of 1962, setting times that were nearly competitive with the open-wheeled racers running in that weekend’s F1 race.

The white hand-hammered aluminum bodied concept car was petite, with a 90-inch wheelbase, an 89-horse V4 and tipping the scales at just 1,148 lbs. and with a top speed of 100 mph. Folks at the Watkins Glen race weekend were eager to get their hands on the car. But in its concept design, the Mustang was not to be. However, two years later the iconic Mustang sports coupe would debut, also in New York, this time at the World’s Fair.

The historic Mustang I Concept got the ball rolling and lent its name to what would become Ford’s iconic pony car. Now Automodello out of Buffalo Grove, Ill., releases a sharp 1:24 re-creation, along with a 1:43 scale model, both in finely detailed resin. The company says just 499 will be made in the larger scale, while 150 Tribute Editions are planned. Those will all be signed by Gurney, its first on-track driver, and cost $150 more. We reviewed the standard 1:24 version. Continue reading Die-cast: Automodello Mustang I

Chasing Classic Cars: A jewel of a Jag and a T’bird with clipped wings

I carry my phone with me all the time!

So I live just a couple of minutes north of Pewaukee Lake, one of Wisconsin‘s largest. On the east shore there is always something going on. Many times I’ll sit with the family when we get ice cream. They’re looking at the sunset 1961 Jaguar XK-150 Convertible, rare Jaguars, collector cars, classic cars, british cars1961 Jaguar XK-150 Convertible, rare Jaguars, collector cars, classic cars, british carswhile I’m looking at the road. So one night we come out of the ice cream shop and what parks right in front of me but this 1961 Jaguar XK-150 convertible. Sorry for the darkness of the images. This model represents the ultimate development of the XK-series cars prior to the advent of the XK-E. Three SU carburetors feed the 3.8-liter engine with valve actuation by dual overhead camshafts and a Weslake-developed ‘gold’ cylinder head. It is virtually identical in all specifications to the XK-E 1951_Kaiser_Darrin, Kaiser autos, Darrin, collectible cars, rare cars, fiberglass cars, chassing classic carspowerplant. The 150S offered the owner/driver the combination of sparkling performance and handling blended with a level of comfort and luxury rarely encountered in thoroughbred sports cars of this period. This is owned by the same guy who owns this Kaiser Darrin. Only made them one year. Fiberglass body and the doors slide it. He is going to keep it un-restored just like you see it here. He also has a Tucker. That’s one heck of a collection. A check with Hemmings and I found alot of Jags that were daily drivers, most in mid five figures but the really good one’s were bumping up to 200K. This car is in that class.

A T’bird that’s a dead bird from a collectors standpoint

This was really sad. There are collectors that would love to have a vintage Thunderbird but not this 64-ish. I mean what was the guy thinking? He had if for sale and last time I rode by it was still there. Go figure. tbird 2

Promo model: 1960 Ford Thunderbird

1960 Ford Thunderbird, 1960 ford thunderbird promotional model, promotional model review.Here’s a quick question and I bet only the T’bird geeks will get it. Geeks in a good way. The T’bird might not have happened at all. Henry Ford II came up with a 2-seat concept and it was called the Vega! Wonder what Chevy would have had to come up with a name for their Vega? Henry’s had meager power, European looks, and cost, so it never proceeded to production. The Thunderbird was similar in concept, but would be more American in style, more luxurious, and less sport-oriented and it became an instant hit. Although the Thunderbird had been considered a rousing success, Ford executives felt that the car’s position as a two-seater restricted its sales potential. The car was redesigned as a four-seater for 1958. Though retaining a design as a two-door hardtop coupe/convertible, the new Thunderbird was considerably larger than the previous generation, with a longer 113.0 inches (2,870 mm) wheelbase to accommodate the new back seat. Continue reading Promo model: 1960 Ford Thunderbird