Tag Archives: Sunbeam

Die-cast: Mazda RX-7 Spirit R Type A

Mazda RX-7 a spirited sports car modelmazda1

Sports cars come and go, a sort of a flavor of the week mentality affects sports car buyers. Since the 1950s there have been MGs, Sunbeams, Triumphs and at the higher end, Corvettes and Porsches.

But occasionally a car maker captures lightning in a bottle, and it maintains some staying power, such as Mazda’s RX-7, which was made from 1978 to 2002 and its iconic Miata. Our topic here is the RX-7, which was famous for its unique twin-rotor Wankel rotary engine, its sporty looks and its pop-up headlights. Oh, and the RX-7 was modestly priced as sports cars go.

Certainly the RX-7 was popular enough to warrant someone like Autoart delivering a fine 1:18 scale, and so it does.

The History

There were three distinct generations of the racy RX-7, the third beginning production in 1991 and known as the FD model for its Japanese VIN number designation. The FD was manufactured until RX-7 production ceased in 2002.

mazda3In 1999 Mazda cranked out one of its racier versions (not that they all weren’t fairly racy), the Spirit R Type A. This model boasted 276 horsepower and a torque rating of 231, put to good use by a 5-speed manual transmission. The Sprint R RX-7 weighed in at a svelte 2,469 lbs. and rode on 17-inch tires and was one of the models most frequently raced. Continue reading Die-cast: Mazda RX-7 Spirit R Type A

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Die-cast: Autoart MGB roadster

Tiny MGB roadster a throwback to early sports carsmg1

England’s MG was one of the early two-seat sports cars that assumed almost epic popularity among enthusiasts in the United States after World War II.

Returning GIs who had seen the small, sporty, fun to drive MGs while stationed in England during the war desired the roadsters once they reestablished themselves after the war.

Old WWII airports around the country were converted into race tracks and road racing’s popularity grew. So the nimble MGs became regular weekend warriors along with Austin Healeys, Jaguars, Sunbeams and Triumphs.

Autoart delivers a tidy 1:43 model of the 1969 MGB Mk. II roadster, the MGB being made from 1962 until 1980. MG began in Abingdon, England, near Oxford, in the early 1920s as Morris Garages, a Morris dealer, began making its own versions of the Morris cars. Design work came from Cecil Kimber. MG made cars for more than 50 years before falling on hard times and being sold to various auto-making entities. The name now is owned by a Chinese automaker.

Continue reading Die-cast: Autoart MGB roadster