Tag Archives: Packard

Die-cast: NEO’s 1932 Packard 902 Standard Eight Coupe

1932 Packard’s beauty shines through in resin model … 1932 Packard

You know you’re mature when you remember seeing Packards for sale at the corner used car lots and driving around the neighborhood, and mine was not a ritzy area.

But for those of us who grew up in the late 1950s and early 1960s, Packard was still a car make we recognized. Certainly Packard’s reputation had been stellar for years, before it slowly and sadly faded away after being purchased by Studebaker. The last Packards were 1958 models.

Yet in its early years and through the 1930s, Packards were considered more than premium motorcars, they were right up there at the pinnacle. One of its classy coupes was the 1932 902 Standard Eight, a two-seater with rumble seat out back. NEO creates a 1/43 scale resin beauty now in dark red with black roof and fenders. The review model comes from American-Excellence.

The History

For 1932, despite the ongoing Depression, Packard rolled out its Ninth Series of cars, all longer, lower and faster than previous models. The Series 902 Coupe was a sweet one with an improved version of Packard’s Standard Eight engine, a 302 cu.in. L-head straight eight creating 110 horsepower.1932 Packard

A new feature that sounds more like it should be on today’s cars was Ride Control adjustable shocks. The system allowed the car’s hydraulic shocks to be adjusted from inside the car. The cars ran smoother and quieter too as rubber engine mounts were employed along with the driveshaft being rubber mounted and jointed. The car also had a self-lubricating chassis. Continue reading Die-cast: NEO’s 1932 Packard 902 Standard Eight Coupe

Advertisements

Die-cast: NEO’s 1933 Cadillac Fleetwood All-weather Pheaton

’33 Cadillac Fleetwood long on style …1933 Cadillac Fleetwood

There have been some fine luxury cars made in the United States, exemplary machines that set the auto world on its proverbial ear. Pierce-Arrow, Packard, Duesenberg, Auburn and Cadillac come to mind.

Only Cadillac is left, but that’s because GM kept it alive through the Great Depression when it was churning out some fantastic cars and engines in a weak market. One model sums up the strong Cadillac effort of that era, its V-16 powered Fleetwood All-Weather Phaeton.

Oh baby, this was a monster with a 149-inch wheelbase. That would make the current Cadillac Escalade SUV look like a mid-size vehicle as the Fleetwood base was 33 inches longer than an Escalade. Now NEO has created this elegant drop-top in 1/24 scale resin, and it’s a deep red beauty.1933 Cadillac Fleetwood

The History

The Fleetwood’s V-16 was new in 1930 and surprised the automotive world that thought the V-12 was the way to go. Caddy created an overhead valve 452 cu.in. V-16 that created 185 horsepower. It was linked it to a 3-speed synchromesh transmission, another Cadillac invention.  Cadillac kept pushing too, following in 1931 with a similar new V-12.

The massive car also featured four-wheel power-assisted brakes, a leaf spring for the front and rear suspension with a solid front axle and live rear axle. Continue reading Die-cast: NEO’s 1933 Cadillac Fleetwood All-weather Pheaton

Die-cast: Automodello’s 1954 Kaiser Darrin

Automodello creates stylish 1/24th Kaiser Darrin …Automodello Kaiser Darrin

There was a fine line between sports cars and two-seat boulevard cruisers as the 1950’s midpoint approached. The British were exporting tiny, nimble, two-seat sports cars in growing numbers to the United States.

This was the heyday of MG, Austin-Healey, and Triumph. Chevrolet, Ford and upstart Kaiser Motors were about to respond, with their Corvette, Thunderbird and Darrin, none exactly sports cars.

Kaiser’s Darrin was by far the most stylish, but was basically a one-year wonder. The others had staying power. Now Automodello has created its own 1/24 scale resin model of the daring Darrin that once was described as looking like it was trying to kiss someone with its puckered oval nose grille.Automodello Kaiser Darrin

The History

Howard “Dutch” Darrin had a long car styling resume, most recently with Packard, before Henry J. Kaiser and Joseph W. Frazer brought him onboard their new Kaiser-Frazer Corp. after World War II. Darrin went on to design a sports car on his own time and with his own funds, then presented it to Kaiser, looking for the company to produce the roadster. Continue reading Die-cast: Automodello’s 1954 Kaiser Darrin

Die-cast: Phoenix Mint 1937 Studebaker Army Ambulance

 

Phoenix Mint delivers high value 1937 Studebaker ambulance

Not every new diecast vehicle is a muscle car or modern model. The Phoenix Mint reaches back to World War II for its vintage 1937 Studebaker Army Ambulance in 1:43 scale.

In this scale and at this price, this 1937 Studebaker ambulance is a deal.
In this scale and at this price, this 1937 Studebaker ambulance is a deal.

Studebaker, an Indiana-based automaker that got its start by making wagons for farmers in the 1850s, was still a thriving company during the war. It had supplied wagons and vehicles to the military for years and its truck lineup was extremely popular in the day. So converting a Coupe Express, that was similar to today’s pickups, or just buying and converting a chassis, engine and cab into useful Army vehicles was easy. Studebaker also made many heavier duty trucks for the military over the years.

For the record, Studebaker merged with Packard in the mid-1950s and made its final car in 1966, at its Canadian plant.

The model:

Phoenix Mint’s version is a no-brainer buy if you love Studebakers or enjoy collecting military vehicles in all their iterations. This is a high value model. Here’s why. Continue reading Die-cast: Phoenix Mint 1937 Studebaker Army Ambulance