Tag Archives: Lincoln

Die-cast: BoS-Models 1957 Imperial Crown Southampton

Imperial Crown Southampton: When styling still mattered … 1957 Imperial Crown Southampton

As a kid I, like many folks at the time, liked cars with jet-like fins. Plus I’ve always been a sucker for the cool fake spare tire molded into the trunk lid. So Imperials, Chrysler’s luxury brand, were, and are, a favorite.

Few Imperials were more impressive than the 1957 Crown Southampton, a monster of a car, but dripping with style. Its nose with twin dual headlights favored Cadillac styling, but its slightly outward leaning tail fins and aircraft-like pointed taillights set it apart from the more staid luxury models of the day.

BoS-Models now creates a beautiful 1957 Southampton in a stunning bronze paint scheme with a cream-colored roof and enough chrome to blind an army of car show onlookers on a sunny day. This is in 1/18 scale and the body is cast resin.

The History

Imperial became its own brand, like Cadillac for GM and Lincoln for Ford, in 1955. The second generation Imperials debuted in 1957 and had their own distinct platforms, something that lasted until 1966.1957 Imperial Crown Southampton

These brutes were big and strong, so sturdy in fact that they were banned from most demolition derbies as being too tough to knock out of competition. Much of the reason was the Imperial’s full perimeter frame with box cross sections forming an “X” for strength. Meanwhile most cars were moving to lighter unibody construction.

The Imperials of 1957, which were part of Chrysler designer Virgil Exner’s “forward look” styling, also featured Torsion-Aire suspensions that used an indirect-acting torsion bar system up front. It lowered the car’s center of gravity and moved it rearward to improve handling. Continue reading Die-cast: BoS-Models 1957 Imperial Crown Southampton

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Die-cast: Automodello 1934 Packard Twelve Convertible Victoria

This gorgeous dark blue model is the rarer Tribute Edition.
This gorgeous dark blue model is the rarer Tribute Edition from Automodello.

Automodello creates stunning 1934 Packard Twelve Convertible

Packard was a big deal prior to World War II, a player, one of the top makes in this country and recognized overseas for its quality and luxury.

Even in 1934 when the Depression was at full song, Packard was turning out fancy machines for the upper crust and its Twelve, named after its impressive 12-cylinder engines, was top-shelf.

Automodello likes Packards, this being its second Twelve release in the last two years. The former 1:43 model was the 1938 Twelve Victoria convertible, while this is the stately ’34 Twelve Victoria, with body designed by Raymond Dietrich. As with many Automodello models, there are three versions.

The History

Dietrich worked for many car companies over his career, including Lincoln, Studebaker, Franklin and Erskine. He co-founded LeBaron and was Chrysler’s first design director. Side note, he also designed the famous Gibson Firebird guitar in the 1960s. Continue reading Die-cast: Automodello 1934 Packard Twelve Convertible Victoria

Chasing Classic Cars: A Lincoln that rode like the wind

A rare classic car

47_lincoln_zephyr_front, chassing classic cars, classic cars, savageonwheels.com 47 lincoln zephyr, lincoln zephyr, classic cars, savageonwheels.comChassic cars, chasing classic cars, 47 lincoln zephyrSo I dropped by the car show that I go to every once in a while not far from my house and this beauty caught my eye.  A 1947 Lincoln Zephyr Convertible. This car is cherry and also famous for a huge V12 engine. I would have loved to hear the owner start it up but he wasn’t around. I posted the image on my Facebook page a short time ago and one of my friends commented that he works with the son of the guy who owns it. Go figure. I told him he should ask for a ride in it or better yet, ask if I could come along. These cars are tough to come by now because of their low production numbers. I saw a couple going for around $70,000.

 

1963 Lincoln Continental Convertible: Young lust

That woman in the convertible

I remember 1963 for the good stuff. My favorite band, the Beach Boys,savageonwheels.com, promotional model cars, model cars were cranking out hits along with a new group from England. Of course I know it’s the Beatles. ’63 was also the year dad packed up the whole family and moved us from Madison, WI., to Milwaukee, WI., where dad went to work for his new employer…..wait for it….American Motors. It was also a good year for AMC since the Rambler Classic was named Motor Trend magazine’s Car of the Year. I also remember another car, non-AMC, that caught my eye. It was a ’63 Lincoln Continental Convertible with the suicide doors that one of our female neighbors drove. Maybe it was just the person driving the car but I had never ridden in a convertible. Sort of that lust thing happening here?

The ’63 was the fourth generation introduced in ’61. It might not have been because it was originally intended to be the 1961 Ford Thunderbird. The design was enlarged and slightly altered before being switched to the Lincoln line. It was the first postwar four-door convertible from a major U.S. manufacturer.

It was because the marketing guys wanted them, right?

Not exactly. “Suicide doors” date back to horse-drawn carriages and were a purely practical decision. The new Continental rode on a wheelbase of 123 inches, and the doors were hinged from the rear to ease getting in and out. When the Lincoln engineers were examining the back seats that styling had made up, the engineers kept hitting the rear doors with their feet so hinging the doors from the rear solved the problem. The doors were to become the best-known feature of 1960s Lincolns. Suicide doors were especially popular in the gangster era of the 1930s, supposedly due to the ease of pushing passengers out of moving vehicles with the feature, according to Dave Brownell, the former editor of Hemmings Motor News. The last mass-produced car model with independently opening suicide doors was the  ’71 Ford Thunderbird four-door sedan. Safety concerns (the lawyers) prevented the subsequent use of such doors and some car companies have used a version when the back door won’t open until the front one is. They don’t use the term anymore. That might be a tough sales pitch. All the Lincoln’s came with huge V8’s since gas was only 29 cents a gallon then.

This generation of Continental is favored by collectors and has appeared in many motion pictures, such as Goldfinger, The Matrix, The Last Action Hero, and the Inspector Gadget films. It has also appeared on TV. Oliver Douglas, (Eddie Albert) in Green Acres owned a Lincoln Continental convertible and it is the vehicle of choice for Michael Chiklis’s character Vincent Savino in the series Vegas. I love both those shows. Watch Vegas for all the older cars in it.

linc convLinc conv 2In my research for this blog entry to see what they are going for now, I started out at my favorite place, Hemming’s and found the example on the left at The Auto Collections museum right off the strip in Vegas. You have to go there! Tons of cool cars and they are all for sale. Win big my friend, win big.

While the car is valued around $77 grand by the National Association of Automobile Dealers Association you can find good examples in the $40’s like this California car on the right. Ah, I can see myself in that car. Hawaiian shirt on, shorts, sunglasses and of course a cold beer.

Good examples of the promo model are hard to find and when they do show up at an auction they are not cheap. This ’63 comes from our friends at Wheat’s Nostalgia. If this isn’t a 10, it has to be pretty close. The vent window posts are there and with no cracks. Another item that will knock down the price is a missing hood ornament and this one has it. There were 27 bidders on eBay for this and it eventually sold for $233. I’m thinking if there are kids or grand kids for the new owner, it goes right into the display case. The only thing it’s missing is that female driver.

Lincoln frontlincoln left sideConv topLincoln rear