Tag Archives: car shows

Car Spot: Mopar madness

70’s classic muscle

The late 60s and early ’70s were great for car guys, and gals, because it was a great time to be into muscle cars. Every manufacturer had a solid foothold but I think Mopar did it best. Between its Dodge and Plymouth lines, you could really kick butt in any street race or at the drag strip. Mark and I went to a car show recently and found some cherry examples.

Based on Chrysler’s B body platform was the Dodge Super Bee. Originally produced from 68 to 71. This 69 1/2 is one of 51 Hemi Orange hardtops with the A12 package, four-speed manual, and bucket seats. The A12 option replaces the 383 4bbl with a 440 3-2bbl engine, including three 2bbl carburetors on top of an Edelbrock aluminum intake. A Hemi 4-speed transmission is standard with the 727 Hemi automatic being available as an option. The drive train upgrade also includes a 26-inch radiator with a 7-blade torque drive fan. Also included are the 9-3/4 Dana (410 gear ratio) rear end and four-wheel 11-inch drum brakes.

Right next to it was a 70 Super Bee. For the 1970 model, the Super Bee received a redesign and a new front end that consisted of a twin-looped front bumper that Dodge Public Relations referred to as “bumble bee wings”. 1970 was really the beginning of the end of the muscle car era as sales fell because of higher insurance rates for performance cars. Built at the St. Louis assembly plant, this came off the line loaded up with a 440 Hemi with three two-barrel carbs, bucket seats, 3.55 rear axle, Rallye Instruments, and more. The owner even has the original window sticker.

My favorite year for the Dodge Charger was 1970. This example was one of just 1,443 built with the four-speed as an RT. One item that you rarely see on one is a luggage rack.

The Dodge Aspen probably doesn’t come to mind when you mention Mopar Muscle but you could purchase one in 1977 that looked like this RT edition. The Aspen, along with its sibling Plymouth Volare replaced the Duster and Dart. This was a time when the manufacturers started to downsize reducing size and weight for improved fuel economy. Originally classified as compact cars, but were considered intermediate-sized cars by the end of their production run in 1980.

The R/T coupes were the performance trim levels. They came with E70x14 tires, “rallye” wheels, a grille blackout treatment, body striping, and identifying decals and medallions. A 360 V8 option was rated at a sad 170 hp. Not particularly quick in the quarter-mile, a Motor Trend test had them doing 17.4 seconds with a top speed of just 86 miles an hour. Yup, not fast and this was really the last shot at anything quick because their replacement was the K cars.

Be sure to check back next Friday for another car spot and have a great weekend.

Car Spot: This Midget was a King

Billed as the World’s Most Exciting Small Car

Just after World War II ended the car business was booming. All those GI’s coming home wanting something new and/or cool to drive. Claud Dry and Dale Orcutt cashed in on that and created the King Midget in 1946. For a time, their company, Midget Motors Corporation was the sixth-largest auto manufacturer. The car was built until 1970. I spotted this at a recent car show in town.

The Model 3 was sold fully assembled, and advertised in magazines like Popular Mechanics and Mechanix Illustrated. It was powered by a rear-mounted, air-cooled, one-cylinder Wisconsin or Kohler engine making 9.2 or 12 horsepower mated to a two-speed automatic transmission. It has a fully independent suspension and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. It gets around 50 mpg and had a top speed of about the same. The 177-inch runabout rides on eight-inch wheels. The car ranged in price from just under $900 up to a bit over $1,000 during its 13-year run. If you’re looking to get into the old car hobby, this is a great entry point. According to NADA pricing, today’s low and high values are $4,300 to $13,000. This car reminds me of Corvairs and VW Beatles in that their smiles per gallon factor are huge.

RELATED POST: See my story about one of the last VW Beatle Convertibles.

Be sure to check back next Friday when I’ll have another car spot. Have a great weekend.

Its mother was an S-10 Blazer

Supercool Rodster

I love unusual cars. Maybe that’s why I like AMC cars so much. They tend to attract me. So I was at this car show in Florida recently where there were all kinds of cool Corvettes, Ford GTs, and even a 1970 AMX. But it was this Rodster that caught my eye. It’s called the Cruisin’ Machine and it’s a kit car.

The Rodster is the brainchild of Henry Caroselli, a talented designer with a background in award-winning advertising work for the Mazda RX-7, the Miata, and a stint at the Magic Kingdon. His intent with the Rodster was to design a cruisin’ machine with several styling traits of historic automobilia and place it on a stout, modern chassis that would make the build easy and make the finished car reliable and dependable and a drive-anywhere looker. The kit costs $3,999 and includes all the body parts and interior. The builder just needs to acquire a Chevy/GMC S-10 Blazer/Jimmy. If you like to build, this one is for you. It’s certainly something you don’t see every day.

A T’bird, a Bel Air, and a Studebaker Avanti show up in the same parking lot…

This is no joke as I saw recently at a car show I attended. Check out the vid.

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